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The Lufthansa Festival takes place at three beautiful and historic venues in the heart of London

St John's, Smith Square

St John's Smith Square

St John's Smith Square, is situated not far from Westminster Abbey and the Houses of Parliament, off Millbank, and only a short walk from Westminster tube station and Parliament Square. Built in 1728, and restored after damage in the Second World War, St John's is one of the finest examples of English Baroque architecture and is considered a masterpiece of this style. St John's has been dubbed 'Queen Anne's Footstool' due to a legend that the architect, Thomas Archer, consulted Queen Anne on the design of the new church. In reply the monarch petulantly kicked over her footstool and snapped 'like that!' Thus the four towers are said to give the building the semblance of an upturned footstool.

St John's is now fully accessible for patrons with limited mobility.  Please inform the Box Office at time of booking if you will be using a wheelchair. Read SJSS Access Guide.

Address:

St John's, Smith Square, London SW1P 3HA
view map

St James's Park, Westminster

Website:

www.sjss.org.uk



Westminster Abbey

Westminster Abbey

An architectural masterpiece of the thirteenth to sixteenth centuries, Westminster Abbey also presents a unique pageant of British history the Confessor's Shrine, the tombs of Kings and Queens, and countless memorials to the famous and the great. It has been the setting for every Coronation since 1066 and for numerous other Royal occasions. Today it is still a church dedicated to regular worship and to the celebration of great events in the life of the nation. Neither a cathedral nor a parish church, Westminster Abbey is a "royal peculiar" under the jurisdiction of a Dean and Chapter, subject only to the Sovereign.

Westminster Abbey, a work of architectural genius, a place of daily worship, deploying the resources of high musical expertise, a burial place of kings, statesmen, warriors, scientists, musicians and poets is the result of a process of development across the centuries, which represents the response of a monastery and later a post-Reformation church to the stimulus and challenge of its environment.

Address:

Westminster Abbey, London SW1P 3PA
(located between St Margaret Street and Victoria Street)
view map

St James's Park, Westminster

Website:

www.westminster-abbey.org



St Peter's, Eaton Square

St Peter's Eaton Square

St Peter's Eaton Square was built in 1827 to meet the spiritual needs of residents in the grand new estate, now known as Belgravia, created by the Grosvenor family. The church was designed by John Henry Hakewill in the Greek Revival style, and was enlarged in the 1870s by Sir Arthur Blomfield, who added the chancel and introduced new stained glass in the nave.  In 1987 the interior of the church was destroyed by fire and was rebuilt by John and Nicki Braithwaite, who converted the Victorian additions to uses which benefit the parish - a church hall, administration floor, sacristy, vesty, vicarage and staff accommodation. St Peter's has long enjoyed a reputation for musical excellence, which continues today in the work of a professional mixed choir, instrumental ensembles and organists, and a thriving, twice-yearly concert series.

Address:

St Peter's Church, 119 Eaton Square, London SW1W 9AL
view map

Victoria

Website:

www.stpetereatonsquare.co.uk